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Out and About – Week of December 23rd

I find it very interesting how life works out. We are born without any teeth and we wear diapers for a while. The final days of our life here on earth, some of us don’t have our teeth anymore, and some of us wear diapers. I’m sure there are a few more similarities, but I won’t go into them at this time. I do, however, want to touch on the topic of napping.

As an infant, naps happen a several times a day. Babies need naps, because their little bodies are developing, and that can wear one out. If babies don’t get their naps, they get quite cranky, and that is not a good thing.

I can’t remember when I stopped taking naps, but I do remember that, in Kindergarten, all of us would place our little rugs on the floor and take maybe a ten-minute nap. This gave Mrs. King, our teacher, a chance to regain her composure. I don’t know if Kindergarteners do this anymore or not. I’ve been told that many high school students take frequent naps during their classes. A cure for this latter action, might be to have the high schooler lie down on a little rug in front of the class.

As I’ve grown older, I’ve found that an afternoon nap can be quite satisfying. I’ve taken a few power naps in my day, and they seemed to do the trick.\

Here is some information for your reading pleasure. Perhaps, after reading it, you won’t feel the least bit guilty about taking that afternoon snooze.

10-20 minute nap: The power nap is ideal for a boost in alertness and energy. The length usually limits one to the lighter stages of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, making it easier to hit the ground running after waking up.

30-minute nap: Sleeping this long may cause sleep inertia, a hangover-like groggy feeling that lasts for up to thirty minutes after waking up, before the nap’s restorative benefits become apparent.

60-minute nap: This nap is better for improvement in remembering facts, faces, and names. It includes slow-wave sleep, the deepest type. The downside might include some grogginess upon waking up.

90-minute nap: This would be a full cycle of sleep, meaning the lighter and deeper stage, including REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep, typically likened to the dreaming stage. This leads to improved emotional and procedural memory and creativity. A nap of this length typically avoids sleep inertia, making it easier to wake up.

I’m a big fan of naps, especially on a dark and gloomy winter day. My naps usually lasts about 120 minutes. My source didn’t talk that much about naps of that length. I usually wake up feeling pretty good and rested. I justify my nap by reminding myself that a nap wouldn’t happen if my body didn’t need it. With that said, I’ll finish the column, find my little rug, and hit the floor.

This being Christmas Eve, we have only hours to come up with a gift for that special someone for Christmas. Here are my final ideas, if you want to get something that wasn’t made in China:

If you know someone whose computer could use a tune-up, and you know a computer geek, who is struggling to get his repair business up and running, give her/him a call.

Local crafts people would love to do business with you. You’d be amazed at what kind of clever gifts they would love to sell you.

Plan your holiday outings at local, owner-operated restaurants, and leave your server a nice tip.

Please give generously to the mail carrier, trash guy, or your babysitter.

~HAVE A JOYOUS HOLIDAY SEASON WITH THOSE YOU LOVE AND CHERISH~

See you Out and About!

Submitted by Norm Stutesman